Family Programs at NMNH

A mother looks at her child through a magnifying glass in a classroom with tables and stools.

 

Make us a part of your family fun!  During our programs, families learn together about nature, science, culture and museum collections in interactive, playful, and creative ways.

MONTHLY FAMILY PROGRAM

The World & Me Family Program Series - Find your place in the world through explorations of nature and culture. Every second Saturday of the month, museum educators lead a program that combines a book reading, activities, and a chance to look more closely at the museum’s collections. These programs are designed for Pre-K to 3rd grade.

 

What happens during a "World & Me" program?

10:30 - 11:00 a.m. - Free exploration of hands-on stations

11:00 - 11:30 a.m. - Book reading

11:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon - Craft activity

 

Upcoming Programs:

Sat., Sept. 8, 2018 - Toakase’s Tapa

A woman sitting on the floor next to a word map reads a book to six children sitting in front of her.

FAMILY DAYS

Discover the natural and cultural world and your place in it during Family Days at NMNH, happening throughout the year. Visitors of all ages get the chance to connect to natural history topics through interactive activities, crafts, demonstrations and conversations with scientists.

 

Upcoming Programs:

 

A young girl sifts through a tray of sand and shell pieces as she does an activity. A man sitting next to her points to a chart in his hand.

WORKSHOPS

These events give families a chance to learn skills and create things together.

 

Past Programs:

Wed., July 18, 2018 - Scientific Illustration Family Workshop: An afternoon in Q?rius exploring the intersection of art and science through natural science illustration. Museum educators led families through the process of mindful observations and then taught techniques for accurate illustration using real museum specimens. No previous drawing experience or skills needed.

Two young women work on a drawing while sitting at a counter with animal specimens in plastic cases in front of them.

Photo credits, from top to bottom:

Smithsonian photo; Smithsonian photo; photo by James Di Loreto, Smithsonian; photo by James Di Loreto, Smithsonian.