Common Whitetail

This image was obtained from the Smithsonian Institution. The image or its contents may be protected by international copyright laws.
MORE IMAGES
MAKE FIELD
BOOK COVER

Make Field Book Cover

Image of Common Whitetail

Create your own field book and fill it with images and object from Q?rius! When you create a field book, you can put this image on its cover.

or Sign up
0
ADD COMMENTS

EXPLORE more

TAGS

COMMENTS

Add a comment

Be the first to leave a comment!

Black meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum danae) mating
Courtesy of Martin Pusteln­k, via BioLib.cz, CC-BY

VIDEO LIBRARY

About Dragonflies and Damselflies (Order Odonata): Reproduction

Mating is a gymnastic affair for dragonflies and damselflies. The male makes sperm at the tip of his abdomen, but his copulatory structure (penis) is higher up. Before mating, a male curves his tail to transfer sperm to his penis. Most males maintain territories to attract females. An attractive territory contains a good site for laying eggs, such as a patch of vegetation sticking out of the water. Once he has a female, the male clutches her with tong-like appendages at the end of his abdomen. In this "tandem" position the pair flies around until they both flex their bodies to bring the male's penis in contact with the tip of her tail. Once fertilized, the female inserts eggs into vegetation or just drops eggs into the water. The male may stand guard, still clutching her or perching nearby, while she lays the eggs. The eggs hatch into aquatic larvae that takes months or years to mature.

Black meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum danae) mating
Courtesy of Martin Pusteln­k, via BioLib.cz, CC-BY

VIDEO LIBRARY

About Dragonflies and Damselflies (Order Odonata): Reproduction

Mating is a gymnastic affair for dragonflies and damselflies. The male makes sperm at the tip of his abdomen, but his copulatory structure (penis) is higher up. Before mating, a male curves his tail to transfer sperm to his penis. Most males maintain territories to attract females. An attractive territory contains a good site for laying eggs, such as a patch of vegetation sticking out of the water. Once he has a female, the male clutches her with tong-like appendages at the end of his abdomen. In this "tandem" position the pair flies around until they both flex their bodies to bring the male's penis in contact with the tip of her tail. Once fertilized, the female inserts eggs into vegetation or just drops eggs into the water. The male may stand guard, still clutching her or perching nearby, while she lays the eggs. The eggs hatch into aquatic larvae that takes months or years to mature.

Related Resources
Black meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum danae) mating
Courtesy of Martin Pusteln­k, via BioLib.cz, CC-BY

VIDEO LIBRARY

About Dragonflies and Damselflies (Order Odonata): Reproduction

Mating is a gymnastic affair for dragonflies and damselflies. The male makes sperm at the tip of his abdomen, but his copulatory structure (penis) is higher up. Before mating, a male curves his tail to transfer sperm to his penis. Most males maintain territories to attract females. An attractive territory contains a good site for laying eggs, such as a patch of vegetation sticking out of the water. Once he has a female, the male clutches her with tong-like appendages at the end of his abdomen. In this "tandem" position the pair flies around until they both flex their bodies to bring the male's penis in contact with the tip of her tail. Once fertilized, the female inserts eggs into vegetation or just drops eggs into the water. The male may stand guard, still clutching her or perching nearby, while she lays the eggs. The eggs hatch into aquatic larvae that takes months or years to mature.

Related Resources
Black meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum danae) mating
Courtesy of Martin Pusteln­k, via BioLib.cz, CC-BY

VIDEO LIBRARY

About Dragonflies and Damselflies (Order Odonata): Reproduction

Mating is a gymnastic affair for dragonflies and damselflies. The male makes sperm at the tip of his abdomen, but his copulatory structure (penis) is higher up. Before mating, a male curves his tail to transfer sperm to his penis. Most males maintain territories to attract females. An attractive territory contains a good site for laying eggs, such as a patch of vegetation sticking out of the water. Once he has a female, the male clutches her with tong-like appendages at the end of his abdomen. In this "tandem" position the pair flies around until they both flex their bodies to bring the male's penis in contact with the tip of her tail. Once fertilized, the female inserts eggs into vegetation or just drops eggs into the water. The male may stand guard, still clutching her or perching nearby, while she lays the eggs. The eggs hatch into aquatic larvae that takes months or years to mature.

Related Resources