Skip to main content

Explore Latin American Collection Objects in Q?rius During Hispanic Heritage Month

My name is Efrain Tejada and I am the Manager of Q?rius, The Coralyn W. Whitney Science Education Center and Q?rius jr: a discovery room at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. I have always been fascinated by the world that surrounds us and how we are related to it. Growing up in El Salvador, I developed a strong interest in pre-Columbian cultures and the way they interacted with the natural world that surrounded them....Read more
Tags: collections
Efrain Tejada sits in Q?rius holding a piece of atacamite from Chile. On the table is a textile wedding mural made in Peru, and a Carnival lion mask from Mexico. Photo by Jennifer Renteria, Smithsonian.

¿Porque la mariposa Morfo Azul es azul? Averígualo como microscopios electrónicos revela la respuesta

¿Porque la mariposa Morfo Azul es azul? Ven a ver por ti mismo en “Viernes de SEM”, una demostración semanal de como nuestros científicos utilizan tecnología de punta para entender las maravillas de la Naturaleza, en Q?rius, El Centro de Educación en Ciencia Coralyn W. Whitney. Mira como se ve una mariposa magnificada hasta 15.000 veces, y descubre los secretos del color de la mariposa y mucho más....Read more
Tags: butterflies
The blue morpho butterfly (Morpho peleides) can be found in tropical areas from Mexico to South America. Smithsonian photo.

Why Are Blue Morpho Butterflies Blue? Find Out How Electron Microscopes Reveal the Answer

Why are blue morpho butterflies blue? Come see for yourself at a weekly presentation of how scientists use state-of-the-art equipment to understand nature’s wonders in Q?rius, The Coralyn W. Whitney Science Education Center. Watch what happens when various liquids contact blue morpho wings. See what a blue morpho sample looks like at 15,000 times magnification, a perspective revealing clues to the butterfly’s color and more....Read more
Tags: butterflies
The blue morpho butterfly (Morpho peleides) can be found in tropical areas from Mexico to South America. Smithsonian photo.

Teens Explore Forensic Anthropology in 'Mystery at Yorktown Creek'

Erosion along a creek bed in Yorktown, Va., exposed something startling: a human skeleton! Scientists excavated the bones to prevent them from being washed away and destroyed, then brought them to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History to be analyzed by our forensic anthropologists. Who was this person, when did he or she live, and what can we learn about his or her life?...Read more
Q?rius volunteer Victor Guerrero shows students a human jawbone during the "Forensic Mysteries: Mystery at Yorktown Creek" school program. Photo by Jennifer Renteria, Smithsonian.

How I Learned to Barcode Lizards during My Internship

This summer, I was a Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) 2.0 Global Genome intern at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The internship began with a two-week "bootcamp," during which we sequenced the DNA of the Iva annua plant (commonly known as the marshelder) in order to figure out what genes were involved in the plant’s domestication....Read more
Tags:
YES! Global Genome intern Camile gained experience working in a lab and learned how to DNA barcode lizards. Smithsonian photo.

Pages

--> -->