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December Events in Q?rius: See Your DNA, Dino-fy Yourself, and Learn How We Chart the Seafloor

by Jasmine Utsey -- Dec 1, 2014
Jasmine Utsey, Learning Program Assistant

Jasmine is a learning program assistant for the Experience Design team in the Museum's Department of Education and Outreach, where she coordinates and...

Dana Clark gets ready to deploy the CTD tool (which measures conductivity, temperature, and depth) from the deck of the NOAA ship Fairweather. Join her Dec. 17 to learn how NOAA charts the seafloor. Photo from NOAA.
Dana Clark gets ready to deploy the CTD tool (which measures conductivity, temperature, and depth) from the deck of the NOAA ship Fairweather. Join her Dec. 17 to learn how NOAA charts the seafloor. Photo from NOAA.

It might be getting cold outside, but science is HOT in Q?rius!

Teens can learn how dinosaurs evolved over time to survive, and then make their own dinosaur-like armor in the “HumanOsaurus: Dino-fy Yourself!” workshop. Visitors of all ages can create necklace pendants made of their own DNA and hear real-life experts share their research into topics from epigenetics to urban forests and seafloor mapping.

Unless otherwise noted, all events are free and take place in Q?rius, the interactive science learning space on the ground floor of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. New event listings and cancellations are possible, so check the Upcoming Events calendar for the most current information.

Dec. 2 - Do You Have the Guts? A Workshop for Teens
People living in the Arctic have been making objects -- from parkas to windows -- out of intestines of marine mammals for generations. In this special workshop, teens will get behind-the-scenes access to the Natural History Museum’s collection, meet contemporary artists who use guts in their work, and then make their own creations out of pig intestine. Q?rius, ground floor 4:30-6:30 p.m. Registration is required as space is limited.

Dec. 3 - Genes in a Bottle
See your own DNA! Take part in a molecular biology activity and create a necklace pendant made up of your own DNA (from a cheek swab). This is a drop-in event. Q?rius, Barbara and Craig Barrett Lab. Wednesdays from 2-4 p.m. and Sundays from 1-3 p.m.
*This activity is not appropriate for children under 7. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Dec. 4 - Expert Is In: Cultural Preservation Through 3-D Digitization and Replication
Anthropologists and Native American communities are using 3-D technology to create replicas of cultural objects for education and preservation. Visit with Dr. Eric Hollinger to discuss how this effort can transform relationships between museums and indigenous groups. This is a drop-in event. Q?rius, ground floor 2-3 p.m.

Dec. 6 - Q?rius and ARTLAB+ Teen Workshop: HumanOsaurus: Dino-fy Yourself!
In this workshop teens will learn from real scientists how to examine fossils to determine how prehistoric animals lived and what they looked like. Teens will investigate how ancient creatures adapted to their environments and evolved over time to survive, then consider how to express those changes in themselves. Working with metal, fabric and LEDs, teens can create their own wearable armor, accessories, or imaginative augmentations to take home! Q?rius, ground floor, 1-3 p.m. This free event is for teens ages 13-19 and registration is required.

Dec. 11 - Live Webcast: Bird Extinctions- Time Travel through Lava Tubes
Helen James is an ornithologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Join her at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST to explore lava tubes of Hawaii for evidence of recent bird extinctions and clues about their causes. This free event can be viewed on the Q?rius website, but registration is requested.

Dec. 13 - Genome Geek Is In - How Nutrition and Environment Affect Your Brain Epigenome
Join Carolina Montaño as she explains the basic definition of epigenetics, its mechanisms, and how environment can affect an individual’s epigenome. This is a drop-in event. Q?rius, ground floor 1-3 p.m.
 
Dec. 15 - Forests in the City, part of the Anthropocene: Life in the Age of Humans Discussion Series
Join Dr. Andrew Johnston, a geographer at the National Air and Space Museum, as he shows how satellite images are used to trace the history of urban forests over many decades in cities like Washington, D.C. How does the view from space help us understand our planet and ourselves? This event is free, but registration is requested. Q?rius Theater, 6-7:30 p.m.

Dec. 17 - Expert Is In:  Charting the Unknown
How do we chart the ocean seafloor and why? Talk with NOAA scientists and Teachers at Sea to discover how multibeam sonar is used to create nautical charts for safe navigation and to discover shipwrecks, extinct volcanoes, and much more. Presented by Teachers at Sea Mary Patterson and Dana Clark and a NOAA hydrographer. This is a drop-in event. Q?rius Theater, 2-4 p.m.

 

 

Categories: Q?rius News
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