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How I Learned to Barcode Lizards during My Internship

This summer, I was a Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) 2.0 Global Genome intern at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The internship began with a two-week "bootcamp," during which we sequenced the DNA of the Iva annua plant (commonly known as the marshelder) in order to figure out what genes were involved in the plant’s domestication....Read more
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YES! Global Genome intern Camile gained experience working in a lab and learned how to DNA barcode lizards. Smithsonian photo.

How Ants Helped Me Feel Comfortable in the Genomics Lab

Before I actually got the chance to work in the lab as a YES! Global Genome intern, I was given a formal lab tour. Being the only 17-year-old African-American girl in a room full of sequencing technology worth more than $1 million was, to say the very least, intimidating....Read more
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YES! Global Genome intern Sal concentrates while using a pipette in the Smithsonian Laboratories of Analytical Biology. Smithsonian photo.

A Unique Field-Trip Opportunity for Title I Middle Schools

For a limited time this spring, Google is providing financial assistance to make field trips to the National Museum of Natural History possible for middle-school students from Title I schools in the D.C. area. For teachers interested in bringing their class or entire grade to the museum for a field trip, this is a unique opportunity to do so....Read more
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Students handle real human bones in Q?rius during a Field Trip Day Sponsored by Google in 2015. Photo by Fiona Wilkinson, Smithsonian.

Learning to Love Microscopic Fossils

When I think of paleobiology, my brain automatically screams “dinosaurs,” but if there is one thing I learned this summer it is that there is more to the Department of Paleobiology than giant Triceratops skulls and ancient T. rex teeth....Read more
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YES! intern Gabe peers into a microscope and sees ostracods, right, a type of microscopic marine fossil. Photos by YES! intern Gabe, Smithsonian.

Teens Explore Forensic Anthropology in 'Mystery at Yorktown Creek'

Erosion along a creek bed in Yorktown, Va., exposed something startling: a human skeleton! Scientists excavated the bones to prevent them from being washed away and destroyed, then brought them to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History to be analyzed by our forensic anthropologists. Who was this person, when did he or she live, and what can we learn about his or her life?...Read more
Q?rius volunteer Victor Guerrero shows students a human jawbone during the "Forensic Mysteries: Mystery at Yorktown Creek" school program. Photo by Jennifer Renteria, Smithsonian.

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