Latest Posts

The Tales that Plants Can Tell

They are silent and stationary, but scientists look to them to tell stories about what happened in the past. Because plants are all around us, and specific in their needs, they are great indicators of ecosystem change. Just as an animal might move to a different place if conditions get rough, plants must adapt. Unfortunately, habitat changes are happening more rapidly than in the past and plants cannot adapt as quickly....Read more
Tags: collections
Ash-grey Indian paintbrush plant in Southern California. Image by Gary A. Monroe, EOL via CalPhotos, CC-BY-NC.

My Three Years as a Science Intern with YES!

At age 14, I was already skinning a small desert rodent and a panther at the National Museum of Natural History. I gave my first tour of the Museum's mammals collection to a group of college students, even though I was only in ninth grade. At 15, I was working on molecular biology with the Museum's Botany Department....Read more
Tags: teens
YES! interns Melissa (left) and Tho prepare rodents in the mammal collection during Melissa’s first year in the program. Photo from Smithsonian Institution.

Webcast Extra: More Answers to Your Questions About Birds

Welcome to the first “Smithsonian Science How” video blog! If you tuned in to the Dec. 11, 2014 live webcast featuring Smithsonian ornithologist Dr. Helen James talking about bird extinctions, you know that the show’s awesome viewers from classrooms across the county were typing in questions fast and furiously. You might say the questions were flying! ...Read more
Smithsonian's Dr. Helen James and Maggy Benson during a live Smithsonian Science How webcast

December Events in Q?rius: See Your DNA, Dino-fy Yourself, and Learn How We Chart the Seafloor

It might be getting cold outside, but science is HOT in Q?rius! Teens can learn how dinosaurs evolved over time to survive, and then make their own dinosaur-like armor in the “HumanOsaurus: Dino-fy Yourself!” workshop. Visitors of all ages can create necklace pendants made of their own DNA and hear real-life experts share their research into topics from epigenetics to urban forests and seafloor mapping....Read more
Tags: genome, ocean, events
Dana Clark gets ready to deploy the CTD tool (which measures conductivity, temperature, and depth) from the deck of the NOAA ship Fairweather. Join her Dec. 17 to learn how NOAA charts the seafloor. Photo from NOAA.

Pages