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The Q? Blog

Can You Stop a Volcano?

by Adam Blankenbicker -- Jan 21, 2016
Photo of Adam Blankenbicker, a geology education specialist at the Museum

Adam is a self-proclaimed “volcanologist-turned-educator” who enjoys designing visitor experiences, especially around, you guessed it, geology. He has led...

Luís and Camile learn about a piece of cave rock during their behind-the-scenes visit with Geologist Ben Andrews. Photo by Adam Blankenbicker, Smithsonian.
Luís and Camile learn about a piece of cave rock during their behind-the-scenes visit with Geologist Ben Andrews. Photo by Adam Blankenbicker, Smithsonian.

Two D.C.-area teens and former Smithsonian interns, Camile and Luís, recently returned in search of answers to their questions about volcanoes. They met with geologist Dr. Ben Andrews, who studies volcanic processes, from the storage of magma to eruption. Ben took the students behind the scenes into the mineral collections at the National Museum of Natural History to see volcanic rocks he studies for his research. The students recorded interviews with him for a series of five podcasts.

Listen to Ben explain why you can't stop a volcano and provide answers to other student questions about how volcanoes work

You can explore volcanic rocks and minerals yourself in the Q?rius Collections Zone. Find out more about rocks that are created from volcanic material (igneous rocks). See information about rocks such as pahoehoe, basaltic glass, pumice, and volcanic ash. You can access these collections online, or visit Q?rius, The Coralyn W. Whitney Science Education Center at the Museum to pick up the objects and examine them under microscopes.

Camile and Luís are both recent graduates of the Museum's Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) program, a career immersion internship for high school students from the D.C. area. Read more about Camile and Luís’s visit on the Smithsonite blog from the Department of Mineral Sciences.

 

The National Museum of Natural History Volcano podcast series referenced above is generously funded by the Ruth Osterweis Selig and Rollyn Osterweis Krichbaum Endowment for the Public Understanding of Research about Nature and Culture.

Categories: YES! Teen Interns