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Q?rius News

Orange “nectar guides” act like runway lights to attract pollinators into the center of a Miltoniopsis orchid. Smithsonian photo by Devin Reese

People all over the U.S. were celebrating National Pollination Week last month. What’s to celebrate about pollination? I asked around the...

A boy shows off his hog-gut art at the 'Do You Have the Guts?' workshop. Smithsonian Institution photo.

A group of local teens and tweens got crafty with hog intestines at a recent art workshop in Q?rius. Inspired by the ingenuity of those living in...

Entomologist David Adamski holds a non-gelechioid moth in Thailand. He'll share his insights into moth adaptations in a talk on July 19. Photo courtesy of David Adamski, Smithsonian.

During any given week, you’ll find a Smithsonian expert giving a public talk in Q?rius at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The...

Male fox moth (Macrothylacia rubi) with a magnificent set of antennae. Photo by Biopix, via EOL, CC-BY-NC

Browsing through moths in the Q?rius Collections at the National Museum of Natural History during...

NSTA members crowd the Collections Zone to examine the some of the 6,000 objects in Q?rius. Photo by Smithsonian Institution.

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members who came to the Q?rius open house July 18 were like kids in a candy store. They peered...

Silky Shark (Carcharhinus falciformis) off the coast of Cuba. Photo by Alex Chernikh, via Wikimedia and EOL, CC-BY.

You may have heard that more people die from vending machine accidents every year than from shark bites. My fourth grader knew that, and it's not...

Marine scientist and author Stephen Palumbi and his son Anthony will show some short films and sign their new book, August 10. Photo courtesy of Stephen Palumbi.

We’re offering a diverse lineup of events this month, including some films, a few ocean-related events, and one about fungi.

All events are...

Middle school students examine an Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structure, or "reef hotel," during a "Reefs Unleashed" school program. Smithsonian photo.

How many species live below the surface of the ocean and how do scientists count them? With so many rocks, corals, and other crevices, there are a...

Students apply their new skills to solve the final challenge in the “Dig Deep” school program. Photo NHB2014-01468 by Leah M. McGlothern, Smithsonian.

Most of us don’t look at a phone, a car, or a building and think, “Where on Earth did they find the materials to build that?” Even if we do think...

Origami passenger pigeons flock together in Q?rius. Photo by Smithsonian Institution.

The last Passenger Pigeon died 100 years ago, on September 1, 1914. Now you can commemorate this famous fowl by folding an origami pattern and displaying it in your home or office. Come to Q?rius on the ground floor of the Museum on weekends and fold your own for free. Learn how to download your own origami pattern and get details about several Passenger Pigeon exhibits.

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